Resize Images with just a Single Click

Resizing and playing with images is an extremely common and important function performed by a computer user. There are a number of instances when you have to send images as emails or upload them to a social networking site. But if the size of the image is pretty big or contains too many resources then it can be a hassle to upload images or send them as attachments to emails.

 It is an extremely simple process to resize and reduce the image with some of the common applications required to edit graphics. Some of such most used applications are PhotoShop from Adobe, Picture Manager from Microsoft, Photo Paint from Corel and lots more. Resizing and reducing images with these applications can be full of hassles too. We have to open the required image, load it onto the application, resize it and then save it to get its reduced format.


It is not as tedious as it seems to be, but you can opt for a more easier and convenient way to resize and reduce images using the Image Resizer Powertoy Clone. It is an extension that allows us to resize one or more images with just a single click of the mouse. After being installed in your computer system, a command called “Resize Image” is added to the right click short cut key.

Not just efficient but this application is extremely simple to implement too. Suppose you are using the Power Point application to make a presentation and need an image to be inserted in one of the slides. On clicking the insert command followed by the photo tag, a small window opens which shows the images that you can browse from. Simply right click on the desired image and the “Resize Picture” comes as a shortcut. Just click on it and the image automatically gets reduced and resized.


After clicking the “Resize Picture” command you will be asked to select the desired size of the image. Some of the default sizes are 640 x 480, 800 x 600, 1024 x 768 (all in pixels). You can also customize the size of the image as per as your own requirement.


Once the image is resized, the new image is saved with the same name along with a size tag, e.g. if a file named Sunset is resized then the new image is stored as Sunset (small), where small indicates the image been reduced.